Key Insights From:
Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil
By Hannah Arendt
Audio Available | 11 Minute Read
Key Insights From:
Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil
By Hannah Arendt
Audio Available | 11 Minute Read
What You'll Learn:

Reporting on the famous 1961 trial in the Israeli court of Jerusalem, political theorist Hannah Arendt recognized something crucial to the psychology of Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann: She wasn’t in the presence of an evil genius or a cruel sociopath, rather the balding, bespectaccled man in front of her appeared entirely average—uncomfortably so. Arendt was struck by what she later termed “the banality of evil,” a phrase that stoked intense controversy for its seemingly dismissive attitude toward the unfathomable horrors of the Holocaust. Despite this misunderstanding, her words reveal a difficult truth: Widespread, unimaginable evil isn’t born from cruelty but from a moral vacuum—when one refuses to think, evil begins to grow.

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